Zambia just said bye bye to frequent power outages and fast on the way to producing enough to export power

African Development Bank Group (AfDBG) in a tweet today from  their verified account congratulated the Southern African country Zambia on their triump over the power supply situation which many African countries still suffer from. 

In the tweet Afdb said "Power cuts are now a thing of the past in Zambia A major boost in electricity production - thanks to a robust hydraulic and solar power generation industry - means the country is now self-sufficient in energy. "

 

Power cuts are now a thing of the past in #Zambia????????! A major boost in electricity production - thanks to a robust hydraulic and solar power generation industry - means the country is now self-sufficient in energy. ????
Read on for more ????????https://t.co/8xUjpP84de pic.twitter.com/udCmVDM5eS

— African Development Bank Group (@AfDB_Group) April 20, 2019


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Zambia’s constant power cuts are now a thing of the past. Thanks to a robust hydraulic and solar power generation industry in recent years, the country is now self-sufficient in energy.  And, there is even better news for citizens of the South African nation- electricity production could soon be in surplus.

Zambia generates practically all its energy production from its own primary resources: biomass, coal and hydroelectricity, with flagship plants such as the power station near the Itezhi-Tezhi Dam, in the south-east of the country, taking centre stage.

The $375 million Itezhi-Tezhi hydroelectric generating station became operational in 2016. The plant has a 120-megawatt capacity and is the fruit of the first public-private partnership project in the Zambian energy sector. Its primary objective has been to produce enough power to end the crippling daily blackouts and meet consumer needs of the country’s 17 million inhabitants.

A strong partnership with Zimbabwe has been the key to Zambia’s success. The two southern African neighbours are working on a major energy project on the Zambezi River, which marks their common border. The 2750 km long river is the fourth-largest on the continent.

The project, which has a projected output of at least 2400 MW, is to be built upstream of the Kariba dam, close to the famous Victoria Falls, at a cost of $3 billion.

Electricity output will be shared equally between Zambia and Zimbabwe, with excess production sold on to other member countries of the Southern African Development Community (SACD), according to the project's initiators.

 

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